• Ballard's Story of O: ‘The Voices of Time’ and the Quest for (Non)Identity

      Wymer, Rowland; Anglia Ruskin University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012-01)
      The Voices of Time’ is the key work from Ballard’s early period, prefiguring the tone and narrative direction of the ‘disaster’ novels and eloquently articulating one of his lifelong preoccupations – the search for identity in a changing environment. At one level the story is a poetic meditation on time and death, an evocation of change and degeneration on a cosmic scale which recalls such works as Spenser’s ‘Mutabilitie Cantos’ or Donne’s ‘The First Anniversary’. Like Donne, Ballard employs up-to-the-minute scientific rhetoric to reinvigorate and revalidate a very traditional lament about the inevitability of decay. Such a lament is also present both in ‘classic’ science fiction texts such as The Time Machine or John W. Campbell’s ‘Twilight’ and in important ‘New Wave’ stories like M. John Harrison’s ‘Running Down’ or Pamela Zoline’s ‘The Heat Death of the Universe’. However, Ballard’s handling of this theme acquires some of its uniqueness from the fact that he was strongly interested in the ideas of both Freud and Jung. Consequently, the protagonist’s quest for identity within the ceaseless flow of time can be read with equal ease as a successful process of Jungian individuation or as a disastrous surrender to the Freudian death drive. At the heart of the story is what Rosemary Jackson has called the ‘goal which lies behind all fantastic art . . . the arrival at a point of absolute unity of self and other, subject and object, at a zero point of entropy’. Whether this ‘zero point’ represents a completion of self or a loss of self, whether the ‘O’ is full or empty, becomes impossible to say, as is also the case with Pauline Reage’s erotic classic The Story of O, which Ballard greatly admired.
    • Becoming an eportfolio teacher.

      Hughes, Julie (Washington, DC: Stylus Publishing, 2009)
      This book: Higher education institutions of all kinds - across the United States and around the world - have rapidly expanded the use of electronic portfolios in a broad range of applications including general education, the major, personal planning, freshman learning communities, advising, assessing, and career planning. Widespread use creates an urgent need to evaluate the implementation and impact of e-portfolios. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, the contributors to this book—all of whom have been engaged with the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research—have undertaken research on how e-portfolios influence learning and the learning environment for students, faculty members, and institutions. This book features emergent results of studies from 20 institutions that have examined effects on student reflection, integrative learning, establishing identity, organizational learning, and designs for learning supported by technology. It also describes how institutions have responded to multiple challenges in e-portfolio development, from engaging faculty to going to scale. These studies exemplify how e-portfolios can spark disciplinary identity, increase retention, address accountability, improve writing, and contribute to accreditation. The chapters demonstrate the applications of e-portfolios at community colleges, small private colleges, comprehensive universities, research universities, and a state system.
    • Blogging for beginners? Using blogs and eportfolios in Teacher Education.

      Hughes, Julie; Purnell, Emma (Lancaster: Lancaster University, Department of Educational Research, 2008)
      This paper explores the use of an eportfolio and an educational blog within, and beyond, a professional pre-service teacher education programme, the Post-Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) for the post-compulsory sector. Writing within dialogic storytelling practices in an online environment allows student teacher development and identity to be seen “as a gradual ‘coming to know’” (Winter, 2003, p.120) dependent upon connections and interactions with others through both text and non-text formats such as metaphor, music and video. The authors explore their personal experiences as teacher (Julie) and learner (Emma) and eportfolio’s potential for longer term impact on and in their professional teaching lives.
    • Bovine enterovirus as an oncolytic virus: foetal calf serum facilitates its infection of human cells.

      Smyth, M; Symonds, A; Brazinova, S; Martin, J; Molecular Structure Solutions, MA Block, Wolverhampton, UK. (2002-07)
      Many viruses have been investigated for their oncolytic properties and potential use as therapeutic agents for cancer treatment. Most of these replication-competent viruses are human pathogens. We investigated the oncolytic properties of an animal virus which is non pathogenic for both its natural host and humans. Bovine enterovirus has previously been shown to exhibit a very wide tissue tropism for cell types in vitro. We compare the ability of bovine enterovirus to replicate in and to cause cytopathic effect in freshly isolated human monocytes and monocyte derived macrophages with the monocyte-like U937 tumour cell line. We also include the adherent ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cell line. We have also carried out infections of bovine enterovirus in the presence and in the absence of serum of bovine origin. Our study shows that the virus will replicate in and produce cytopathic effect in the U937 and ZR-75-1 cell types to the same extent as the cells (BHK-21) in which the virus is routinely propagated. We believe bovine enterovirus to be a worthwhile candidate for further study as an anti-tumour agent.
    • Chemistry for the Life Sciences

      Sutton, Raul; Rockett, Bernard; Swindells, Peter G. (CRC Press (Taylor & Francis), 2008)
      Focuses on the particular aspects of chemistry that underpin biochemical and biomedical studies • Includes new chapters on emerging topics of interest • Offers a sequence of short topics with numerical or conceptual ideas supported by worked examples and questions within the text • Provides a solutions manual for qualified instructors Presents short topics tied to numerical or conceptual ideas, reinforced with worked examples and questions Retaining theuser-friendly style of the first edition, this text is designed to fill the knowledge gap for those life sciences students who have not studied chemistry at an advanced level. It contains new chapters on – • Water, covering the mole concept and colloids • Gases, discussing pressure, gas laws, partial pressure, solubility of gases, and diffusion • Metals in biology, including properties, oxygen carriers, biocatalysis, charge carriers, and toxicity The authors divide their analysis of carbon compounds into two chapters. One focuses exclusively on aliphatic carbon compounds, while the other provides a greatly expanded exploration of aromatic carbon compounds, isomerism, amines and amino acids, including benzene, aromaticity, types of isomerism, and absolute configuration. With a current examination of organic and biological reactions, this instructional volume also features end-of-chapter questions and a solutions manual.
    • CIRCUS for Beginners

      Boehm, Carola; Patterson, John (2001)
      This paper describes “Content Integrated Research in Creative User Systems” (CIRCUS), a working group of the ESPRIT programme of the European Union; describing its origins, its main concerns, and viewing some of its conclusions. The paper examines the distinction between the practice-based art and design community and the more knowledge-based computer technology community. The CIRCUS research agenda has been led by the concept of creative pull, a concept which gives priority, even control, to the creative maker or user in the development of technological capability. The paper examines the working group and its focus on this concept and how to support it through technological means.
    • The cognitive processes underlying the academic reading construct as measured by IELTS

      Weir, Cyril J.; Hawkey, Roger; Green, Anthony; Devi, Sarojani (Canberra : IELTS Australia : British Council, 2009-01-03)
    • Contextualised approaches to widening participation a comparative case study of two UK universities

      Butcher, John; Corfield, Rohini; Rose-Adams, John; University of Derby (The Open University/, 2012-01)
      This article reports on institutional research at two contrasting UK universities, each with different foci in relation to widening participation (WP). The researchers sought to explore senior staff perspectives on the WP agenda at a time of unprecedented uncertainty and turmoil in the UK higher education sector. The research consisted primarily of interview data from university leaders responsible strategically for WP activity. The findings offer a nuanced narrative of the policy and practice of widening participation at two contrasting universities. Researchers found that the WP discourse itself is perceived as confused and discredited. Viewing ‘widening participation students’ as a homogenised group risks both the benefits of differentiated responses through discipline or subject areas and the benefits of more student-centred measures of success.
    • Converting Sweet Sorghum to Ethanol - An Alternative Feedstock for Renewable Fuels

      Waters, Heather (The University of Arizona., 2012)
      The goal of this project was to design an ethanol production process from sweet sorghum for use as a renewable fuel. Sorghum stalks are first harvested and sent through a series of 2 three-roller extractors (70% total efficiency). Extracted juice is pumped to the reactor for preservation and fermentation. Sodium metabisulfite preserves the juice. Ethanol Red (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is the fermentation yeast. Following fermentation, the juice (8% ethanol by mass) is distilled to achieve 90% ethanol. A molecular sieve extracts excess water, resulting in 100% ethanol. Plant wastes accumulate during the process. These wastes are collected, dried, and sold as animal feed for profit. The project economics indicate that the overall process is not currently economically feasible. The net present value (NPV) for the optimum economic situation, assuming a 15 year plant lifetime and 15% interest rate, is -$125 M. Under these circumstances, the ethanol would need to be sold at $44.37 per gallon to break even. To improve this process, further development of methods for increasing juice extraction efficiency should be explored. Additionally, the distillation process could be enhanced with a second distillation column to achieve 95% ethanol prior to using the molecular sieve.
    • Cross-modal face identity aftereffects and their relation to priming.

      Hills, Peter J.; Elward, Rachael L.; Lewis, Michael B. (2013-06-27)
    • CROWN-C: A High-Assurance Service-Oriented Grid Middleware System

      Townend, Paul; Looker, Nik; Zhang, Dacheng; Xu, Jie; Li, Jianxin; Zhong, Liang; Huai, Jinpeng (2013-07-01)
    • Data Sharing in Crime Prevention: Why and How

      Moss, Kate; Pease, Ken (2013-06-27)