• Latent fingermark pore area reproducibility

      Gupta, A.; Buckley, K.; Sutton, R. (2013-06-28)
    • Letting in the Trojan mouse: Using an eportfolio system to re-think pedagogy.

      Hughes, Julie (The Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ascilite), 2008-02-15)
      E-learning research, as an emergent field in the UK, is highly political in nature (Conole & Oliver, 2007, p.6) occupying a complex landscape which houses policy-makers, researchers and practitioners. Increasingly and more interestingly, the landscape is being shaped by the narratives and experiences of the learners themselves (Creanor et al., 2006, Conole et al., 2006) and the use of Web 2.0 technologies. However, as Laurillard (2007, p.xv) reminds us we still, ‘tend to use technology to support traditional modes of teaching’ and ‘we scarcely have the infrastructure, the training, the habits or the access to the new technology, to be optimising its use just yet’ (p.48). Web 2.0 spaces, literacies and practices offer the possibility for new models of education (Mayes & de Freitas, 2007, p.13) which support iterative and integrative learning but as educators and higher educational establishments are we prepared and ready to re-think our pedagogies and re-do (Beetham & Sharpe 2007, p.3) our practices? This concise paper will reflect upon how the use of new learning landscapes such as eportfolios might offer us the opportunity to reflect upon the implications of letting in the e-learning eportfolio Trojan mouse (Sharpe & Oliver, 2007, p.49).
    • Linking Object-Z with Spec#

      Qin, Shengchao; He, Guanhua (2013-07-01)
    • The lived experience of climate change´: creating open educational resources and virtual mobility for an innovative, integrative and competence-based track at Masters level

      Abbott, Dina; Wilson, Gordon; Pérez, P.; Willems, P.; Academics from EU universities: see paper for full affliations (Inderscience Publishers, 2012-05-29)
      This paper explores a new integrative approach to climate change education at Masters level. Drawing on the authors’ involvement in a European Union Erasmus project, it is argued that the diversity of knowledge(s) on climate change are a source of active/social learning. The wide variety of disciplinary, sectoral and lived experiential (both individual and collective) knowledge(s) are all considered legitimate in this exercise, the aim of which is to construct new interdisciplinary knowledge from their boundary interfaces. We further argue for a corresponding pedagogy based on developing transboundary competences – the ability to engage in social learning and action through communicative engagement across knowledge boundaries. We acknowledge that the challenges for enacting transboundary competence are considerable when it requires mobility across epistemological, even ontological, boundaries. The challenges are further compounded when the communicative engagement across space and time requires virtual mobility which is ICT-enabled. Nevertheless, meeting them is a normative goal, not only for this expanded, integrative approach to climate change education, but also for a global resolution of climate change itself.
    • Looking beyond the visible: contesting environmental agendas for Mumbai slums

      Abbott, Dina; Department of Development Geography, University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2009)
      Slums are the most immediate, visible symbols of poverty and environmental degra-dation intertwined in cities. They are a constant reminder of national shame and the state’s incapacity or political will to tackle poverty. In cities where the poor and rich share spaces, the rich will attempt to mentally and morally distance themselves from the slums, often regarding these as eyesores, health hazards, and dens of corruption and immoral behaviour. Yet slums are home to millions, from single householders to intergenerational extended families. Within each slum locality, there is intense social networking to safe¬guard common interest, provide informal services for neighbours and enhance the ability to carry out livelihood opportunities. There is a clear contrast in the way slums are regarded by ‘outsiders’, and those who actually live there. Equally there is a difference in which both outsiders and slum dwellers understand environmental needs. A key question for this chapter is, therefore, what is the contested nature of environ-mental agendas in urban areas and who or what defines it? This chapter draws on Mumbai as an example to argue that within shared spaces, whilst there may be commonality of environmental interests, environmental agendas are often shaped by those who are more powerful and vocal.
    • Metadata interoperability in agricultural learning repositories: An analysis

      Manouselis, Nikos; Najjar, Jehad; Kastrantas, Kostas; Salokhe, Gauri; Stracke, Christian M.; Duval, Erik (2010-03-01)
      The rapid evolution of ICT creates numerous opportunities for agricultural education and training. Digital learning resources are organized in online databases called learning repositories, in which people can search, locate, and access resources. In order to facilitate the exchange of information between such repositories, the issue of metadata interoperability is crucial. In this paper, we particularly focus on metadata interoperability of learning repositories with content relevant to agricultural stakeholders. More specifically, we present results from an analysis of implementations of metadata standards in agricultural learning repositories around the world. The results provide useful feedback to the developers of repositories with educational content for agricultural stakeholders, as well as directions for potential harmonization of work in this area.
    • Metadata Principles and Practicalities

      Duval, Erik; Hodgins, Wayne; Sutton, Stuart; Weibel, Stuart L.
      The rapid changes in the means of information access occasioned by the emergence of the World Wide Web have spawned an upheaval in the means of describing and managing information resources. Metadata is a primary tool in this work, and an important link in the value chain of knowledge economies. Yet there is much confusion about how metadata should be integrated into information systems. How is it to be created or extended? Who will manage it? How can it be used and exchanged? Whence comes its authority? Can different metadata standards be used together in a given environment? These and related questions motivate this paper. The authors hope to make explicit the strong foundations of agreement shared by two prominent metadata Initiatives: the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) and the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Learning Object Metadata (LOM) Working Group. This agreement emerged from a joint metadata taskforce meeting in Ottawa in August, 2001. By elucidating shared principles and practicalities of metadata, we hope to raise the level of understanding among our respective (and shared) constituents, so that all stakeholders can move forward more decisively to address their respective problems. The ideas in this paper are divided into two categories. Principles are those concepts judged to be common to all domains of metadata and which might inform the design of any metadata schema or application. Practicalities are the rules of thumb, constraints, and infrastructure issues that emerge from bringing theory into practice in the form of useful and sustainable systems.
    • Micro-Specialization: Dynamic Code Specialization in DBMSes

      Zhang, Rui (The University of Arizona., 2012)
      Database management systems (DBMSes) form a cornerstone of modern IT infrastructure, and it is essential that they have excellent performance. In this research, we exploit the opportunities of applying dynamic code specialization to DBMSes, particularly by focusing on runtime invariant present in DBMSes during query evaluation. Query evaluation involves extensive references to the relational schema, predicate values, and join types, which are all invariant during query evaluation, and thus are subject to dynamic value-based code specialization. We observe that DBMSes are general in the sense that they must contend with arbitrary schemas, queries, and modifications; this generality is implemented using runtime metadata lookups and tests that ensure that control is channelled to the appropriate code in all cases. Unfortunately, these lookups and tests are carried out even when information is available that renders some of these operations superfluous, leading to unnecessary runtime overheads. We introduce micro-specialization, an approach that uses relation- and query-specific information to specialize the DBMS code at runtime and thereby eliminate some of these overheads. We develop a taxonomy of approaches and specialization times and propose a general architecture that isolates most of the creation and execution of the specialized code sequences in a separate DBMS-independent module. We show that this approach requires minimal changes to a DBMS and can improve the performance simultaneously across a wide range of queries, modifications, and bulk-loading, in terms of storage, CPU usage, and I/O time of the TPC-H and TPC-C benchmarks. We also discuss an integrated development environment that helps DBMS developers apply micro-specializations to identified target code sequences.
    • Mitoparans: mitochondriotoxic cell penetrating peptides and novel inducers of apoptosis.

      Jones, Sarah; Martel, Cecile; Belzacq-Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Brenner, Catherine; Brenner, Catherine (Australian Peptide Association, 2007)
      Introduction: The amphipathic helical peptide mastoparan (MP; H-INLKALAALAKKIL-NH2) inserts into biological membranes to modulate the activity of heterotrimeric G proteins and other targets. Moreover, whilst cell free models of apoptosis demonstrate MP to facilitate mitochondrial permeability transition and release of apoptogenic cytochrome c, MP-induced death of intact cells has been attributed to its non-specific membrane destabilising properties (necrotic mechanisms). However, MP and related peptides are known to activate other signalling systems, including p42/p44 MAP kinases and could therefore, also modulate cell fate and specific apoptotic events. The ability of MP to facilitate mitochondrial permeability in cell free systems has lead to proposals that MP could be of utility in tumour therapeutics provided that it conferred features of cellular penetration and mitochondrial localization. We have recently reported that our highly potent amphipathic MP analogue mitoparan (mitP; [Lys5,8Aib10]MP; Aib = -aminoisobutyric acid) specifically promotes apoptosis of human cancer cells, as was confirmed by in situ TUNEL staining and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, we have also demonstrated that mitP penetrates plasma membranes and redistributes to co-localize with mitochondria. Complementary studies, using isolated mitochondria, further demonstrated that mitP, through co-operation with a protein of the permeability transition pore complex voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), induced swelling and permeabilization of mitochondria, leading to the release of the apoptogenic factor cytochrome c. An expanding field of peptide and cell penetrating peptide (CPP) research has focussed on the selective targeting of tumours by engineering constructs that incorporate cell-specific or tissue–specific address motifs. Peptidyl address motifs could enhance the selectivity of drug delivery whilst the improved cellular uptake offered by CPP enhances bioavailability. Thus and as a potential therapeutic strategy, we extended our findings to design target-specific mitP analogues. The integrin-specific address motif RGD and a Fas ligand mimetic WEWT were incorporated by N-terminal acylation of mitP to produce novel tandem-linked chimeric peptides.
    • Mitoparans: mitochondriotoxic cell penetrating peptides and novel inducers of apoptosis.

      Jones, Sarah; Martel, Cecile; Belzacq-Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Brenner, Catherine; Howl, John D. (Australian Peptide Association, 2007)
      Introduction: The amphipathic helical peptide mastoparan (MP; H-INLKALAALAKKIL-NH2) inserts into biological membranes to modulate the activity of heterotrimeric G proteins and other targets. Moreover, whilst cell free models of apoptosis demonstrate MP to facilitate mitochondrial permeability transition and release of apoptogenic cytochrome c, MP-induced death of intact cells has been attributed to its non-specific membrane destabilising properties (necrotic mechanisms). However, MP and related peptides are known to activate other signalling systems, including p42/p44 MAP kinases and could therefore, also modulate cell fate and specific apoptotic events. The ability of MP to facilitate mitochondrial permeability in cell free systems has lead to proposals that MP could be of utility in tumour therapeutics provided that it conferred features of cellular penetration and mitochondrial localization. We have recently reported that our highly potent amphipathic MP analogue mitoparan (mitP; [Lys5,8Aib10]MP; Aib = -aminoisobutyric acid) specifically promotes apoptosis of human cancer cells, as was confirmed by in situ TUNEL staining and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, we have also demonstrated that mitP penetrates plasma membranes and redistributes to co-localize with mitochondria. Complementary studies, using isolated mitochondria, further demonstrated that mitP, through co-operation with a protein of the permeability transition pore complex voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), induced swelling and permeabilization of mitochondria, leading to the release of the apoptogenic factor cytochrome c. An expanding field of peptide and cell penetrating peptide (CPP) research has focussed on the selective targeting of tumours by engineering constructs that incorporate cell-specific or tissue–specific address motifs. Peptidyl address motifs could enhance the selectivity of drug delivery whilst the improved cellular uptake offered by CPP enhances bioavailability. Thus and as a potential therapeutic strategy, we extended our findings to design target-specific mitP analogues. The integrin-specific address motif RGD and a Fas ligand mimetic WEWT were incorporated by N-terminal acylation of mitP to produce novel tandem-linked chimeric peptides.
    • Modeling longitudinal changes in maximal-intensity exercise performance in young male rowing athletes.

      Mikulic, Pavle; Blazina, Tomislav; Nevill, Alan M.; Markovic, Goran (Human Kinetics, 2013-06-27)
      he purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of age and body size upon maximal-intensity exercise performance in young rowing athletes. Male participants (n = 171) aged 12-18 years were assessed using an "all-out" 30-s rowing ergometer test, and reassessed after 12 months. The highest rate of performance development, which amounts to [mean(SD)] +34%(23%) and +32%(23%) for mean and maximal power output, respectively, is observed between the ages of 12 and 13, while this rate of development gradually declines as the athletes mature through adolescence. Performance increases with body size, and mass, stature and chronological age all proved to be significant (all p < .05) explanatory variables of mean power output, with respective exponents [mean(SE)] of 0.56(0.08), 1.84(0.30) and 0.07(0.01), and of maximal power output, with respective exponents of 0.54(0.09), 1.76(0.32) and 0.06(0.01). These findings may help coaches better understand the progression of rowing performance during adolescence.
    • MuTaTeD’ll A System for Music Information Retrieval of Encoded Music

      Boehm, Carola (Library and Information Commission, 2001)
      This is the final publication of the results of the project “MuTaTed’II”, A system for Information Retrieval of Encoded Music”. The aim of the project was to design and implement an information retrieval system with delivery/access services for digital music and sound. The project was documented and the results presented at various conferences; (ICMC 2000 Berlin, ISMI 2000 Massachusetts, Euromicro 2000 Amsterdam).
    • Natural Heart: Yangchun Lake Suburban Center Master Plan

      Wang, Yuxin (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      Urbanization in China is rapidly improving with the economic growth. But the development that ignores environment has caused lots of environmental problems in Chinese cities, especially the large ones. As the capital of Hubei Province, Wuhan is the fifth among China cities for its size and its economic production. Because of extreme urbanization and high dense population in Wuhan city, some significant issues have been constantly emerged: lack of adequate wastewater management and water resources protection, urgent need for efficient solution to sludge treatment and disposal, serious urban flooding because of the natural flow or urban lakes and streams restriction, degradation of water quality, and so on. These issues have been seriously impacted the quality life in the city. Along with the urbanization, the conflicts between urban development and ecosystem are inescapable. How can urban development balance environmental sensitivity to support ecological health in the vulnerable urban ecosystem and mitigate the problems in the city? This project tries to redesign a master plan for Yangchun Lake sub-urban center in Wuhan city and find suitable ways to mitigate these problems with attention to the environmental, functional, economic, social and aesthetics aspects of the proposed solutions. The design will balance the urban development and environmental protection, support and enhance the development of a new ecological urban center.
    • Neurophysiological and Psychological Predictors of Social Functioning in Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

      Kim, Yourim; Kwon, Aeran; Min, Dongil; Kim, Sungkean; Jin, Min Jin; Lee, Seung-Hwan (2019-10-07)
    • New Life Behind Bars - A Prison Retrofit From Prison to Community Resource

      Machado, Micaela (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      Sustainability practices in design development are a common goal in urban settings, especially in an environment such as the arid Southwest U.S. where resources are limited. Here, sunshine and heat are abundant where water resources are low. So, how can we use these circumstances and constraints to our advantage in future designs or in potential retrofits? Institutional establishments with long-term residents, such as prisons, which use a significant amount of resources can reduce their energy, food and water costs by using sustainable practices. These practices can help reduce the costs of prisoner housing and eventually lower costs to tax payers. This project focuses on a hypothetical retrofit of the Wilmot Department of Corrections (Wilmot D.O.C.) prison facility in Tucson, AZ.
    • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, DNA Repair and Cancer

      Dibra, Harpreet K.; Perry, Chris J.; Nicholl, Iain D. (InTech, 2011)
    • NP animacy identification for anaphora resolution

      Orasan, Constantin; Evans, Richard (American Association for Artificial Intelligence, 2007)
      In anaphora resolution for English, animacy identification can play an integral role in the application of agreement restrictions between pronouns and candidates, and as a result, can improve the accuracy of anaphora resolution systems. In this paper, two methods for animacy identification are proposed and evaluated using intrinsic and extrinsic measures. The first method is a rule-based one which uses information about the unique beginners in WordNet to classify NPs on the basis of their animacy. The second method relies on a machine learning algorithm which exploits a WordNet enriched with animacy information for each sense. The effect of word sense disambiguation on the two methods is also assessed. The intrinsic evaluation reveals that the machine learning method reaches human levels of performance. The extrinsic evaluation demonstrates that animacy identification can be beneficial in anaphora resolution, especially in the cases where animate entities are identified with high precision.