• A.I. Techniques for Modelling Anger in Emotional Agents

      Slater, Stuart; Moreton, Robert; Buckley, Kevan (University of Wolverhampton, School of Computing and Information Technology, 2008)
      The research presented here, attempts to review a range of techniques commonly categorized under the umbrella of artificial intelligence (A.I.) that could be applied when developing agents with emotions in a range of applications. The paper focuses on anger (and its related emotions), an emotion strongly linked with aggression which of course forms the basis of many computer games where killing or attacking other players or in-game agents is often central to the game’s purpose. The paper begins with a psychology focused review of anger and its related emotions, before presenting techniques to encode some of these elements using Finite State Machines and Fuzzy Logic.
    • Activity at the Michigan Cyber Range

      Adams, Joe
      Joe Adams will update a number of Cyber Range activities, including its use in academic courses, a new set of Range hardware at Northern Michigan University, and a Red Team/Blue Team exercise recently conducted in Grand Rapids and Ann Arbor.
    • Ballard's Story of O: ‘The Voices of Time’ and the Quest for (Non)Identity

      Wymer, Rowland; Anglia Ruskin University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012-01)
      The Voices of Time’ is the key work from Ballard’s early period, prefiguring the tone and narrative direction of the ‘disaster’ novels and eloquently articulating one of his lifelong preoccupations – the search for identity in a changing environment. At one level the story is a poetic meditation on time and death, an evocation of change and degeneration on a cosmic scale which recalls such works as Spenser’s ‘Mutabilitie Cantos’ or Donne’s ‘The First Anniversary’. Like Donne, Ballard employs up-to-the-minute scientific rhetoric to reinvigorate and revalidate a very traditional lament about the inevitability of decay. Such a lament is also present both in ‘classic’ science fiction texts such as The Time Machine or John W. Campbell’s ‘Twilight’ and in important ‘New Wave’ stories like M. John Harrison’s ‘Running Down’ or Pamela Zoline’s ‘The Heat Death of the Universe’. However, Ballard’s handling of this theme acquires some of its uniqueness from the fact that he was strongly interested in the ideas of both Freud and Jung. Consequently, the protagonist’s quest for identity within the ceaseless flow of time can be read with equal ease as a successful process of Jungian individuation or as a disastrous surrender to the Freudian death drive. At the heart of the story is what Rosemary Jackson has called the ‘goal which lies behind all fantastic art . . . the arrival at a point of absolute unity of self and other, subject and object, at a zero point of entropy’. Whether this ‘zero point’ represents a completion of self or a loss of self, whether the ‘O’ is full or empty, becomes impossible to say, as is also the case with Pauline Reage’s erotic classic The Story of O, which Ballard greatly admired.
    • Bovine enterovirus as an oncolytic virus: foetal calf serum facilitates its infection of human cells.

      Smyth, M; Symonds, A; Brazinova, S; Martin, J; Molecular Structure Solutions, MA Block, Wolverhampton, UK. (2002-07)
      Many viruses have been investigated for their oncolytic properties and potential use as therapeutic agents for cancer treatment. Most of these replication-competent viruses are human pathogens. We investigated the oncolytic properties of an animal virus which is non pathogenic for both its natural host and humans. Bovine enterovirus has previously been shown to exhibit a very wide tissue tropism for cell types in vitro. We compare the ability of bovine enterovirus to replicate in and to cause cytopathic effect in freshly isolated human monocytes and monocyte derived macrophages with the monocyte-like U937 tumour cell line. We also include the adherent ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cell line. We have also carried out infections of bovine enterovirus in the presence and in the absence of serum of bovine origin. Our study shows that the virus will replicate in and produce cytopathic effect in the U937 and ZR-75-1 cell types to the same extent as the cells (BHK-21) in which the virus is routinely propagated. We believe bovine enterovirus to be a worthwhile candidate for further study as an anti-tumour agent.
    • Chemistry for the Life Sciences

      Sutton, Raul; Rockett, Bernard; Swindells, Peter G. (CRC Press (Taylor & Francis), 2008)
      Focuses on the particular aspects of chemistry that underpin biochemical and biomedical studies • Includes new chapters on emerging topics of interest • Offers a sequence of short topics with numerical or conceptual ideas supported by worked examples and questions within the text • Provides a solutions manual for qualified instructors Presents short topics tied to numerical or conceptual ideas, reinforced with worked examples and questions Retaining theuser-friendly style of the first edition, this text is designed to fill the knowledge gap for those life sciences students who have not studied chemistry at an advanced level. It contains new chapters on – • Water, covering the mole concept and colloids • Gases, discussing pressure, gas laws, partial pressure, solubility of gases, and diffusion • Metals in biology, including properties, oxygen carriers, biocatalysis, charge carriers, and toxicity The authors divide their analysis of carbon compounds into two chapters. One focuses exclusively on aliphatic carbon compounds, while the other provides a greatly expanded exploration of aromatic carbon compounds, isomerism, amines and amino acids, including benzene, aromaticity, types of isomerism, and absolute configuration. With a current examination of organic and biological reactions, this instructional volume also features end-of-chapter questions and a solutions manual.
    • CIRCUS for Beginners

      Boehm, Carola; Patterson, John (2001)
      This paper describes “Content Integrated Research in Creative User Systems” (CIRCUS), a working group of the ESPRIT programme of the European Union; describing its origins, its main concerns, and viewing some of its conclusions. The paper examines the distinction between the practice-based art and design community and the more knowledge-based computer technology community. The CIRCUS research agenda has been led by the concept of creative pull, a concept which gives priority, even control, to the creative maker or user in the development of technological capability. The paper examines the working group and its focus on this concept and how to support it through technological means.
    • CROWN-C: A High-Assurance Service-Oriented Grid Middleware System

      Townend, Paul; Looker, Nik; Zhang, Dacheng; Xu, Jie; Li, Jianxin; Zhong, Liang; Huai, Jinpeng (2013-07-01)
    • Distinguishing dune environments based on topsoil characteristics: a case study on the Sefton Coast

      Millington, Jennifer A.; Booth, Colin A.; Fullen, Michael A.; Trueman, Ian C.; Worsley, Annie T. (Coastal Defence: Sefton MBC Technical Services Department, 2010)
      It is important to understand the effects of coastal change on the migration of coastal dune environments and their associated imprint on soil processes, for both environmental and ecological motives. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) have been applied to investigate soil spatial patterns and their controlling influences on the Sefton dunes. To verify relationships between plant communities and soil types, groundtruthing of existing vegetation maps has been achieved through analysis of representative, geo-referenced, topsoil (0-5 cm) samples (n = 115), fromclassified dune environments (n = 10), for the purpose of distinguishing dune environments from their soil characteristics. Samples were analysed for pH, organic matter content, particle size, total soil organic carbon and total soil nitrogen, geochemical composition and magnetic susceptibility. Significant differences (p <0.05) are apparent for the suite of soil characteristics collated, indicating individual dune environments are associated with specific soil properties. Therefore, identification and mapping of dune soil habitats can provide baseline information for conservation management.
    • The effect of substrate on the reproducibility of inked fingerprint pore dimensions examined using photomicrography.

      Gupta, Abhishek; Buckley, K.A.; Sutton, Raul (The Fingerprint Society, 2007)
      Requests for back issues or copies of articles should be made to The Archivist at The Fingerprint Society.
    • Effects of Palm-mat Geotextiles on the Conservation of Loamy Sand Soils in East Shropshire, UK

      Bhattacharyya, Ranjan; Davies, Kathleen; Fullen, Michael A.; Booth, Colin A. (2008)
      Some 30% of world arable land has become unproductive, largely due to soil erosion. Considerable efforts have been devoted to studying and controlling water erosion. However, there remains the need for efficient, environmentallyfriendly and economically-viable options. An innovative approach has used geotextiles constructed from Borassus aethiopum (Black Rhun Palm of West Africa) leaves to decrease soil erosion. The effectiveness of employing palmmats to reduce soil erosion have been investigated by measuring runoff, soil loss and soil splash on humid temperate soils. Twelve experimental soil plots (each measuring 1.0 x 1.0 m) were established at Hilton, east Shropshire, UK, to study the effects of geotextiles on splash erosion (six plots completely covered with Borassus mats and six non-protected bare soil plots). Soil splash was measured (10/06/02-09/02/04; total precipitation = 1038 mm) by collecting splashed particles in a centrally positioned trap in each plot. An additional field study (25/03/02-10/05/04; total precipitation = 1320 mm) of eight experimental runoff plots (10 x 1 m on a 15o slope) were used at the same site, with duplicate treatments: (i) bare soil; (ii) grassed, (iii) bare soil with 1 m palm-mat buffer zones at the lower end of the plots and (iv) completely covered with palm-mats. Runoff volume and sediment yield were measured after each substantial storm. Results indicate that total splash erosion in bare plots was 34.2 g m-2 and mean splash height was 20.5 cm. The use of Borassus mats on bare soil significantly (P<0.05) reduced soil splash height by ~31% and splash erosion by ~50%. Total runoff from bare plots was 3.58 L m-2 and total sediment yield was 8.58 g m-2. Thus, application of geotextiles as 1 m protective buffer strips on bare soil reduced runoff by ~36% and soil erosion by ~57%. Although total soil loss from the completely covered geotextile plots was ~16% less than the buffer zone plots, total runoff volume from the completely covered plots was ~94% more than the buffer zone plots. Thus, palm-mat (buffer strips) cover on vulnerable segments of the landscape is highly effective for soil and water conservation on temperate loamy sand soils.
    • Emptying Frames

      Henderson, Neil (2010-10-01)
      This short essay brings together some thoughts about two films, both of which take as their starting point the photographic still image and use film to expand and question the immobility of that image, teasing out small shifts and changes in its appearance. What follows are some observations about how these films reflect on their photographic materiality, the relationship between the still and moving image, the filmic interval, and the film and its projector. In the context of animation both films explore the boundaries of what constitutes the form. What are the most minimal conditions for ‘animation’ to take place? Can movement come from a single still image? In Candle (2007) and Tidal (2007), two obsolete and disappearing media come together to reflect on their own condition, their material and temporalit
    • The Forensic Institute Research Network.

      Sutton, Raul; Jamieson, Allan J. (York: Physical Sciences Centre, The Higher Education Academy, 2008)
      The burgeoning activity in forensic science in universities continues to attract criticism. A positive aspect is the potential to inject a much-needed boost to research in all forensic practices. Only recently has fingerprinting, for example, been exposed to rigorous scientific examination and, to a great extent, been found wanting as regards its science – probability apparently has no place in fingermark examination. In response to the opportunity The Forensic Institute brought together representatives from more than 40 UK universities to discuss how this new resource, academics and students, could be used to further research in the forensic sciences. It was envisaged that many casework-related problems, such as environmental frequencies of trace evidence, could be best accomplished by a lot of small student projects coordinated on a national and perhaps international level by a steering group. This steering group in turn would be part of an integrated research strategy developed in conjunction with practitioners. A virtuous cycle of practice, research, development, and practice would be the outcome. And so, in 2004, The Forensic Institute Research Network (FIRN) was born.
    • Form and function: examples of music interface design

      Hoadley, Richard; Anglia Ruskin University (British Computer Society, 2010-09)
      This paper presents observations on the creation of digital music controllers and the music that they generate from the perspectives of the designer and the artist. In the case of musical instruments, what is the role of the form (the hardware) where it concerns the function (the production of musically interesting sounds)? Specific projects are presented, and a set of operational principles is supported from those examples. The associated encounter session will allow delegates to experiment with the interfaces exhibited, further informing these principles.
    • From Visual Semantic Parameterization to Graphic Visualization

      Xin Zeng; Mehdi, Q.H.; Gough, N.E. (2013-06-28)
    • HighSpec

      Dong, J. S.; Hao, P.; Zhang, X.; Qin, S. C. (2013-07-01)
    • Hydrophobins: New prospects for biotechnology

      Cox, P.W.; Hooley, P. (2013-06-28)
    • Identification and biological applications of rhegnylogically-organized cell penetrating peptides.

      Howl, John D.; Jones, Sarah (Australian Peptide Association, 2007)
      Introduction: Many different cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been utilized as vectors to affect the highly efficient intracellular delivery of bioactive moieties. A majority of such studies employ sychnologically-organized tandem combinations of a cargo (message) and a CPP (address). To date, bioactive cargoes have included peptides, proteins and a range of oligonucleotides attached either by direct chemical conjugation or as a component of a larger macromolecular complex. Moreover, a majority of CPPs, including the commonly used sequences Tat and penetratin, are designed to be both biologically and toxicologically inert. More recently, a QSAR-based algorithm has been developed to predict cryptic polycationic CPP motifs within the primary sequences of proteins. As described here, this novel technology has enabled the study of rhegnylogic CPPs in which multiple pharmacophores for cellular penetration and desirable biological activities are discontinuously organized within the primary sequence of single peptide. This organization differs from the more commonly utilized sychnologic strategy which joins functionally discrete and continous address and messages together in a tandem construct.
    • Implementation and development of interfaces for music performance through analysis of improvised dance movements

      Hoadley, Richard; Anglia Ruskin University (Audio Engineering Society, 2010-04)
      Electronic music, even when designed to be interactive, can lack performance interest and is frequently musically unsophisticated. This is unfortunate because there are many aspects of electronic music that can be interesting, elegant, demonstrative and musically informative. The use of dancers to interact with prototypical interfaces comprising clusters of sensors generating music algorithmically provides a method of investigating human actions in this environment. This is achieved through collaborative work involving software and hardware designers, composers, sculptors and choreographers who examine aesthetically and practically the interstices of these disciplines. The proposed paper investigates these interstices.