• Distinguishing dune environments based on topsoil characteristics: a case study on the Sefton Coast

      Millington, Jennifer A.; Booth, Colin A.; Fullen, Michael A.; Trueman, Ian C.; Worsley, Annie T. (Coastal Defence: Sefton MBC Technical Services Department, 2010)
      It is important to understand the effects of coastal change on the migration of coastal dune environments and their associated imprint on soil processes, for both environmental and ecological motives. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) have been applied to investigate soil spatial patterns and their controlling influences on the Sefton dunes. To verify relationships between plant communities and soil types, groundtruthing of existing vegetation maps has been achieved through analysis of representative, geo-referenced, topsoil (0-5 cm) samples (n = 115), fromclassified dune environments (n = 10), for the purpose of distinguishing dune environments from their soil characteristics. Samples were analysed for pH, organic matter content, particle size, total soil organic carbon and total soil nitrogen, geochemical composition and magnetic susceptibility. Significant differences (p <0.05) are apparent for the suite of soil characteristics collated, indicating individual dune environments are associated with specific soil properties. Therefore, identification and mapping of dune soil habitats can provide baseline information for conservation management.
    • The effect of substrate on the reproducibility of inked fingerprint pore dimensions examined using photomicrography.

      Gupta, Abhishek; Buckley, K.A.; Sutton, Raul (The Fingerprint Society, 2007)
      Requests for back issues or copies of articles should be made to The Archivist at The Fingerprint Society.
    • Effects of Palm-mat Geotextiles on the Conservation of Loamy Sand Soils in East Shropshire, UK

      Bhattacharyya, Ranjan; Davies, Kathleen; Fullen, Michael A.; Booth, Colin A. (2008)
      Some 30% of world arable land has become unproductive, largely due to soil erosion. Considerable efforts have been devoted to studying and controlling water erosion. However, there remains the need for efficient, environmentallyfriendly and economically-viable options. An innovative approach has used geotextiles constructed from Borassus aethiopum (Black Rhun Palm of West Africa) leaves to decrease soil erosion. The effectiveness of employing palmmats to reduce soil erosion have been investigated by measuring runoff, soil loss and soil splash on humid temperate soils. Twelve experimental soil plots (each measuring 1.0 x 1.0 m) were established at Hilton, east Shropshire, UK, to study the effects of geotextiles on splash erosion (six plots completely covered with Borassus mats and six non-protected bare soil plots). Soil splash was measured (10/06/02-09/02/04; total precipitation = 1038 mm) by collecting splashed particles in a centrally positioned trap in each plot. An additional field study (25/03/02-10/05/04; total precipitation = 1320 mm) of eight experimental runoff plots (10 x 1 m on a 15o slope) were used at the same site, with duplicate treatments: (i) bare soil; (ii) grassed, (iii) bare soil with 1 m palm-mat buffer zones at the lower end of the plots and (iv) completely covered with palm-mats. Runoff volume and sediment yield were measured after each substantial storm. Results indicate that total splash erosion in bare plots was 34.2 g m-2 and mean splash height was 20.5 cm. The use of Borassus mats on bare soil significantly (P<0.05) reduced soil splash height by ~31% and splash erosion by ~50%. Total runoff from bare plots was 3.58 L m-2 and total sediment yield was 8.58 g m-2. Thus, application of geotextiles as 1 m protective buffer strips on bare soil reduced runoff by ~36% and soil erosion by ~57%. Although total soil loss from the completely covered geotextile plots was ~16% less than the buffer zone plots, total runoff volume from the completely covered plots was ~94% more than the buffer zone plots. Thus, palm-mat (buffer strips) cover on vulnerable segments of the landscape is highly effective for soil and water conservation on temperate loamy sand soils.
    • Emptying Frames

      Henderson, Neil (2010-10-01)
      This short essay brings together some thoughts about two films, both of which take as their starting point the photographic still image and use film to expand and question the immobility of that image, teasing out small shifts and changes in its appearance. What follows are some observations about how these films reflect on their photographic materiality, the relationship between the still and moving image, the filmic interval, and the film and its projector. In the context of animation both films explore the boundaries of what constitutes the form. What are the most minimal conditions for ‘animation’ to take place? Can movement come from a single still image? In Candle (2007) and Tidal (2007), two obsolete and disappearing media come together to reflect on their own condition, their material and temporalit
    • The Forensic Institute Research Network.

      Sutton, Raul; Jamieson, Allan J. (York: Physical Sciences Centre, The Higher Education Academy, 2008)
      The burgeoning activity in forensic science in universities continues to attract criticism. A positive aspect is the potential to inject a much-needed boost to research in all forensic practices. Only recently has fingerprinting, for example, been exposed to rigorous scientific examination and, to a great extent, been found wanting as regards its science – probability apparently has no place in fingermark examination. In response to the opportunity The Forensic Institute brought together representatives from more than 40 UK universities to discuss how this new resource, academics and students, could be used to further research in the forensic sciences. It was envisaged that many casework-related problems, such as environmental frequencies of trace evidence, could be best accomplished by a lot of small student projects coordinated on a national and perhaps international level by a steering group. This steering group in turn would be part of an integrated research strategy developed in conjunction with practitioners. A virtuous cycle of practice, research, development, and practice would be the outcome. And so, in 2004, The Forensic Institute Research Network (FIRN) was born.
    • Form and function: examples of music interface design

      Hoadley, Richard; Anglia Ruskin University (British Computer Society, 2010-09)
      This paper presents observations on the creation of digital music controllers and the music that they generate from the perspectives of the designer and the artist. In the case of musical instruments, what is the role of the form (the hardware) where it concerns the function (the production of musically interesting sounds)? Specific projects are presented, and a set of operational principles is supported from those examples. The associated encounter session will allow delegates to experiment with the interfaces exhibited, further informing these principles.
    • From Visual Semantic Parameterization to Graphic Visualization

      Xin Zeng; Mehdi, Q.H.; Gough, N.E. (2013-06-28)
    • HighSpec

      Dong, J. S.; Hao, P.; Zhang, X.; Qin, S. C. (2013-07-01)
    • Hydrophobins: New prospects for biotechnology

      Cox, P.W.; Hooley, P. (2013-06-28)
    • Identification and biological applications of rhegnylogically-organized cell penetrating peptides.

      Howl, John D.; Jones, Sarah (Australian Peptide Association, 2007)
      Introduction: Many different cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been utilized as vectors to affect the highly efficient intracellular delivery of bioactive moieties. A majority of such studies employ sychnologically-organized tandem combinations of a cargo (message) and a CPP (address). To date, bioactive cargoes have included peptides, proteins and a range of oligonucleotides attached either by direct chemical conjugation or as a component of a larger macromolecular complex. Moreover, a majority of CPPs, including the commonly used sequences Tat and penetratin, are designed to be both biologically and toxicologically inert. More recently, a QSAR-based algorithm has been developed to predict cryptic polycationic CPP motifs within the primary sequences of proteins. As described here, this novel technology has enabled the study of rhegnylogic CPPs in which multiple pharmacophores for cellular penetration and desirable biological activities are discontinuously organized within the primary sequence of single peptide. This organization differs from the more commonly utilized sychnologic strategy which joins functionally discrete and continous address and messages together in a tandem construct.
    • Implementation and development of interfaces for music performance through analysis of improvised dance movements

      Hoadley, Richard; Anglia Ruskin University (Audio Engineering Society, 2010-04)
      Electronic music, even when designed to be interactive, can lack performance interest and is frequently musically unsophisticated. This is unfortunate because there are many aspects of electronic music that can be interesting, elegant, demonstrative and musically informative. The use of dancers to interact with prototypical interfaces comprising clusters of sensors generating music algorithmically provides a method of investigating human actions in this environment. This is achieved through collaborative work involving software and hardware designers, composers, sculptors and choreographers who examine aesthetically and practically the interstices of these disciplines. The proposed paper investigates these interstices.
    • Implementation and development of sculptural interfaces for digital performance of music through embodied expression

      Hoadley, Richard; Anglia Ruskin University (British Computer Society, 2010-07)
      This demonstration paper describes the conception, design and implementation of a hardware/software musical interface and its use in performance with a group of dancers and a choreographer. It investigates the design and development of such interfaces in the light of these experiences and presents material from two of these custom interfaces. The work examines the nature of digital interfaces for musical expression through the use of multiple sensors, the data from which is used to generate and control multiple musical parameters in software. This enables levels of expression and diversity not generally available using conventional electronic interfaces, the latter frequently being limited to the direct control of a limited number of musical parameters. The combination of hardware design and algorithmic manipulation combined with the expressive potential of dance and embodied movement is of particular interest. Reflecting links between embodied movement and expression in live performance, the feedback between form and function is also considered, as are collaborations with sculptors to develop and enhance the physical behaviour and visual appearance of these devices.
    • Integration of multimedia technology into the curriculum of forensic science courses using crime scene investigations.

      Sutton, Raul; Hammerton, Matthew; Trueman, Keith J. (2007)
      Virtual reality technology is a powerful tool for the development of experimental learning in practical situations. Creation of software packages with some element of virtual learning allows educators to broaden the available experience of students beyond the scope that a standard curriculum provides. This teaching methodology is widely used in the delivery of medical education with many surgical techniques being practised via virtual reality technologies (see Engum et al., 2003). Use has been made of this technology for a wide range of teaching applications such as virtual field trials for an environmental science course (Ramasundaram et al., 2005), and community nursing visiting education scenarios (Nelson et al., 2005) for example. Nelson et al. (2005) imaged three-dimensional representations of patient living accommodation incorporating views of patient medication in order to deliver care modules via a problem-based learning approach. The use of virtual reality in the teaching of crime scene science was pioneered by the National Institute of Forensic Science in Australia as part of their Science Proficiency Advisory Committee testing programme. A number of scenarios were created using CDROM interfacing, allowing as near as possible normal procedures to be adopted. This package included proficiency testing integrated into the package and serves as a paradigm for the creation of virtual reality crime scene scenarios (Horswell, 2000). The package is commercially available on CD-ROM as part of the series ‘After the Fact’ (http://www.nfis.com.au). The CD-ROM package is geared to proficiency training of serving scenes of crime officers and thus contains details that may not be needed in the education of other parties with a need for forensic awareness. These include undergraduate students studying towards forensic science degree programmes in the UK as well as serving Police Officers. These groups may need virtual reality crime scene material geared to their specific knowledge requirements. In addition, Prof J Fraser, President of the Forensic Science Society and a former police Scientific Support Manager, speaking to the United Kingdom, House of Commons Science and Technology Select Committee in its report ‘Forensic Science on Trial’ (2005) states: ‘The documented evidence in relation to police knowledge of forensic science, in terms of making the best use of forensic science, is consistently clear, that their knowledge needs to improve and therefore their training needs to improve’. This clearly identifies a need for further training of serving police officers in forensic science. It was with this in mind that staff at the University collaborated with the West Midlands Police Service. The aim was to create a virtual reality CD-ROM that could serve as part of the continuing professional development of serving police officers in the area of scene management. Adaptation of the CD-ROM could allow some introductory materials to help undergraduate students of forensic science.
    • An Interactive Educational Game For Children in Education

      Mehdi, Qasim; Salim, Aly; Walters, Kristy (University of Wolverhampton, School of Computing and Information Technology, 2008)
      This paper presents an interactive educational game for Primary School children studying KEY Stage Two History. This game is designed specifically for children to support their continuing studies and to enhance their knowledge and memory retention. The work involves the investigation into Multimedia Design Methodologies and Instructional Systems Design (ISD) Models to support the development of the Instructional Multimedia Model (IMM) in order to provide a structured approach to the development of Interactive Educational Games. In this work, the development process of the interactive educational game will be outlined together with examples. This development is based on a model tailored for an educational multimedia application development which combines ISD and multimedia disciplines contributes to the success of the resulting application. The paper will discuss how each phase has an influence upon the next and the pedagogical factors which the model takes into account work in line with those required for Multimedia
    • An interactive speech interface for virtual characters in dynamic environments

      Mehdi, Qasim; Zeng, Xin; Gough, Norman (2004)
      In this paper, we propose a new improvement to our 3D Virtual Story Environment System (3DVSE) by adding a real-time animation with voice synthesis. The new system offers a flexible and easy way to generate an interactive 3D virtual Environment (3DVE) as compared to traditional 3D packages. It enables the user to control and interact with the virtual characters via speech instructions so that the characters can respond to the commands in real time. This system has the potential, if combined with artificial intelligence, to act as a dialogue interface for believable agents that have many applications such as computer games, and intelligent multimedia applications. In this system, the agent can talk and listen to fellow agents and human users.
    • Issues and considerations regarding sharable data sets for recommender systems in technology enhanced learning

      Drachsler, Hendrik; Bogers, Toine; Vuorikari, Riina; Verbert, Katrien; Duval, Erik; Manouselis, Nikos; Beham, Guenter; Lindstaedt, Stephanie; Stern, Hermann; Friedrich, Martin; et al. (2010-01-01)
      This paper raises the issue of missing data sets for recommender systems in Technology Enhanced Learning that can be used as benchmarks to compare different recommendation approaches. It discusses how suitable data sets could be created according to some initial suggestions, and investigates a number of steps that may be followed in order to develop reference data sets that will be adopted and reused within a scientific community. In addition, policies are discussed that are needed to enhance sharing of data sets by taking into account legal protection rights. Finally, an initial elaboration of a representation and exchange format for sharable TEL data sets is carried out. The paper concludes with future research needs.
    • Latent fingermark pore area reproducibility

      Gupta, A.; Buckley, K.; Sutton, R. (2013-06-28)
    • Linking Object-Z with Spec#

      Qin, Shengchao; He, Guanhua (2013-07-01)
    • Metadata interoperability in agricultural learning repositories: An analysis

      Manouselis, Nikos; Najjar, Jehad; Kastrantas, Kostas; Salokhe, Gauri; Stracke, Christian M.; Duval, Erik (2010-03-01)
      The rapid evolution of ICT creates numerous opportunities for agricultural education and training. Digital learning resources are organized in online databases called learning repositories, in which people can search, locate, and access resources. In order to facilitate the exchange of information between such repositories, the issue of metadata interoperability is crucial. In this paper, we particularly focus on metadata interoperability of learning repositories with content relevant to agricultural stakeholders. More specifically, we present results from an analysis of implementations of metadata standards in agricultural learning repositories around the world. The results provide useful feedback to the developers of repositories with educational content for agricultural stakeholders, as well as directions for potential harmonization of work in this area.
    • Metadata Principles and Practicalities

      Duval, Erik; Hodgins, Wayne; Sutton, Stuart; Weibel, Stuart L.
      The rapid changes in the means of information access occasioned by the emergence of the World Wide Web have spawned an upheaval in the means of describing and managing information resources. Metadata is a primary tool in this work, and an important link in the value chain of knowledge economies. Yet there is much confusion about how metadata should be integrated into information systems. How is it to be created or extended? Who will manage it? How can it be used and exchanged? Whence comes its authority? Can different metadata standards be used together in a given environment? These and related questions motivate this paper. The authors hope to make explicit the strong foundations of agreement shared by two prominent metadata Initiatives: the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) and the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Learning Object Metadata (LOM) Working Group. This agreement emerged from a joint metadata taskforce meeting in Ottawa in August, 2001. By elucidating shared principles and practicalities of metadata, we hope to raise the level of understanding among our respective (and shared) constituents, so that all stakeholders can move forward more decisively to address their respective problems. The ideas in this paper are divided into two categories. Principles are those concepts judged to be common to all domains of metadata and which might inform the design of any metadata schema or application. Practicalities are the rules of thumb, constraints, and infrastructure issues that emerge from bringing theory into practice in the form of useful and sustainable systems.