• HighSpec

      Dong, J. S.; Hao, P.; Zhang, X.; Qin, S. C. (2013-07-01)
    • Hydrophobins: New prospects for biotechnology

      Cox, P.W.; Hooley, P. (2013-06-28)
    • Identification and biological applications of rhegnylogically-organized cell penetrating peptides.

      Howl, John D.; Jones, Sarah (Australian Peptide Association, 2007)
      Introduction: Many different cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been utilized as vectors to affect the highly efficient intracellular delivery of bioactive moieties. A majority of such studies employ sychnologically-organized tandem combinations of a cargo (message) and a CPP (address). To date, bioactive cargoes have included peptides, proteins and a range of oligonucleotides attached either by direct chemical conjugation or as a component of a larger macromolecular complex. Moreover, a majority of CPPs, including the commonly used sequences Tat and penetratin, are designed to be both biologically and toxicologically inert. More recently, a QSAR-based algorithm has been developed to predict cryptic polycationic CPP motifs within the primary sequences of proteins. As described here, this novel technology has enabled the study of rhegnylogic CPPs in which multiple pharmacophores for cellular penetration and desirable biological activities are discontinuously organized within the primary sequence of single peptide. This organization differs from the more commonly utilized sychnologic strategy which joins functionally discrete and continous address and messages together in a tandem construct.
    • Implementation and development of interfaces for music performance through analysis of improvised dance movements

      Hoadley, Richard; Anglia Ruskin University (Audio Engineering Society, 2010-04)
      Electronic music, even when designed to be interactive, can lack performance interest and is frequently musically unsophisticated. This is unfortunate because there are many aspects of electronic music that can be interesting, elegant, demonstrative and musically informative. The use of dancers to interact with prototypical interfaces comprising clusters of sensors generating music algorithmically provides a method of investigating human actions in this environment. This is achieved through collaborative work involving software and hardware designers, composers, sculptors and choreographers who examine aesthetically and practically the interstices of these disciplines. The proposed paper investigates these interstices.
    • Implementation and development of sculptural interfaces for digital performance of music through embodied expression

      Hoadley, Richard; Anglia Ruskin University (British Computer Society, 2010-07)
      This demonstration paper describes the conception, design and implementation of a hardware/software musical interface and its use in performance with a group of dancers and a choreographer. It investigates the design and development of such interfaces in the light of these experiences and presents material from two of these custom interfaces. The work examines the nature of digital interfaces for musical expression through the use of multiple sensors, the data from which is used to generate and control multiple musical parameters in software. This enables levels of expression and diversity not generally available using conventional electronic interfaces, the latter frequently being limited to the direct control of a limited number of musical parameters. The combination of hardware design and algorithmic manipulation combined with the expressive potential of dance and embodied movement is of particular interest. Reflecting links between embodied movement and expression in live performance, the feedback between form and function is also considered, as are collaborations with sculptors to develop and enhance the physical behaviour and visual appearance of these devices.
    • Integration of multimedia technology into the curriculum of forensic science courses using crime scene investigations.

      Sutton, Raul; Hammerton, Matthew; Trueman, Keith J. (2007)
      Virtual reality technology is a powerful tool for the development of experimental learning in practical situations. Creation of software packages with some element of virtual learning allows educators to broaden the available experience of students beyond the scope that a standard curriculum provides. This teaching methodology is widely used in the delivery of medical education with many surgical techniques being practised via virtual reality technologies (see Engum et al., 2003). Use has been made of this technology for a wide range of teaching applications such as virtual field trials for an environmental science course (Ramasundaram et al., 2005), and community nursing visiting education scenarios (Nelson et al., 2005) for example. Nelson et al. (2005) imaged three-dimensional representations of patient living accommodation incorporating views of patient medication in order to deliver care modules via a problem-based learning approach. The use of virtual reality in the teaching of crime scene science was pioneered by the National Institute of Forensic Science in Australia as part of their Science Proficiency Advisory Committee testing programme. A number of scenarios were created using CDROM interfacing, allowing as near as possible normal procedures to be adopted. This package included proficiency testing integrated into the package and serves as a paradigm for the creation of virtual reality crime scene scenarios (Horswell, 2000). The package is commercially available on CD-ROM as part of the series ‘After the Fact’ (http://www.nfis.com.au). The CD-ROM package is geared to proficiency training of serving scenes of crime officers and thus contains details that may not be needed in the education of other parties with a need for forensic awareness. These include undergraduate students studying towards forensic science degree programmes in the UK as well as serving Police Officers. These groups may need virtual reality crime scene material geared to their specific knowledge requirements. In addition, Prof J Fraser, President of the Forensic Science Society and a former police Scientific Support Manager, speaking to the United Kingdom, House of Commons Science and Technology Select Committee in its report ‘Forensic Science on Trial’ (2005) states: ‘The documented evidence in relation to police knowledge of forensic science, in terms of making the best use of forensic science, is consistently clear, that their knowledge needs to improve and therefore their training needs to improve’. This clearly identifies a need for further training of serving police officers in forensic science. It was with this in mind that staff at the University collaborated with the West Midlands Police Service. The aim was to create a virtual reality CD-ROM that could serve as part of the continuing professional development of serving police officers in the area of scene management. Adaptation of the CD-ROM could allow some introductory materials to help undergraduate students of forensic science.
    • An Interactive Educational Game For Children in Education

      Mehdi, Qasim; Salim, Aly; Walters, Kristy (University of Wolverhampton, School of Computing and Information Technology, 2008)
      This paper presents an interactive educational game for Primary School children studying KEY Stage Two History. This game is designed specifically for children to support their continuing studies and to enhance their knowledge and memory retention. The work involves the investigation into Multimedia Design Methodologies and Instructional Systems Design (ISD) Models to support the development of the Instructional Multimedia Model (IMM) in order to provide a structured approach to the development of Interactive Educational Games. In this work, the development process of the interactive educational game will be outlined together with examples. This development is based on a model tailored for an educational multimedia application development which combines ISD and multimedia disciplines contributes to the success of the resulting application. The paper will discuss how each phase has an influence upon the next and the pedagogical factors which the model takes into account work in line with those required for Multimedia
    • An interactive speech interface for virtual characters in dynamic environments

      Mehdi, Qasim; Zeng, Xin; Gough, Norman (2004)
      In this paper, we propose a new improvement to our 3D Virtual Story Environment System (3DVSE) by adding a real-time animation with voice synthesis. The new system offers a flexible and easy way to generate an interactive 3D virtual Environment (3DVE) as compared to traditional 3D packages. It enables the user to control and interact with the virtual characters via speech instructions so that the characters can respond to the commands in real time. This system has the potential, if combined with artificial intelligence, to act as a dialogue interface for believable agents that have many applications such as computer games, and intelligent multimedia applications. In this system, the agent can talk and listen to fellow agents and human users.
    • Issues and considerations regarding sharable data sets for recommender systems in technology enhanced learning

      Drachsler, Hendrik; Bogers, Toine; Vuorikari, Riina; Verbert, Katrien; Duval, Erik; Manouselis, Nikos; Beham, Guenter; Lindstaedt, Stephanie; Stern, Hermann; Friedrich, Martin; et al. (2010-01-01)
      This paper raises the issue of missing data sets for recommender systems in Technology Enhanced Learning that can be used as benchmarks to compare different recommendation approaches. It discusses how suitable data sets could be created according to some initial suggestions, and investigates a number of steps that may be followed in order to develop reference data sets that will be adopted and reused within a scientific community. In addition, policies are discussed that are needed to enhance sharing of data sets by taking into account legal protection rights. Finally, an initial elaboration of a representation and exchange format for sharable TEL data sets is carried out. The paper concludes with future research needs.
    • Latent fingermark pore area reproducibility

      Gupta, A.; Buckley, K.; Sutton, R. (2013-06-28)
    • Linking Object-Z with Spec#

      Qin, Shengchao; He, Guanhua (2013-07-01)
    • Metadata interoperability in agricultural learning repositories: An analysis

      Manouselis, Nikos; Najjar, Jehad; Kastrantas, Kostas; Salokhe, Gauri; Stracke, Christian M.; Duval, Erik (2010-03-01)
      The rapid evolution of ICT creates numerous opportunities for agricultural education and training. Digital learning resources are organized in online databases called learning repositories, in which people can search, locate, and access resources. In order to facilitate the exchange of information between such repositories, the issue of metadata interoperability is crucial. In this paper, we particularly focus on metadata interoperability of learning repositories with content relevant to agricultural stakeholders. More specifically, we present results from an analysis of implementations of metadata standards in agricultural learning repositories around the world. The results provide useful feedback to the developers of repositories with educational content for agricultural stakeholders, as well as directions for potential harmonization of work in this area.
    • Metadata Principles and Practicalities

      Duval, Erik; Hodgins, Wayne; Sutton, Stuart; Weibel, Stuart L.
      The rapid changes in the means of information access occasioned by the emergence of the World Wide Web have spawned an upheaval in the means of describing and managing information resources. Metadata is a primary tool in this work, and an important link in the value chain of knowledge economies. Yet there is much confusion about how metadata should be integrated into information systems. How is it to be created or extended? Who will manage it? How can it be used and exchanged? Whence comes its authority? Can different metadata standards be used together in a given environment? These and related questions motivate this paper. The authors hope to make explicit the strong foundations of agreement shared by two prominent metadata Initiatives: the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) and the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Learning Object Metadata (LOM) Working Group. This agreement emerged from a joint metadata taskforce meeting in Ottawa in August, 2001. By elucidating shared principles and practicalities of metadata, we hope to raise the level of understanding among our respective (and shared) constituents, so that all stakeholders can move forward more decisively to address their respective problems. The ideas in this paper are divided into two categories. Principles are those concepts judged to be common to all domains of metadata and which might inform the design of any metadata schema or application. Practicalities are the rules of thumb, constraints, and infrastructure issues that emerge from bringing theory into practice in the form of useful and sustainable systems.
    • Mitoparans: mitochondriotoxic cell penetrating peptides and novel inducers of apoptosis.

      Jones, Sarah; Martel, Cecile; Belzacq-Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Brenner, Catherine; Howl, John D. (Australian Peptide Association, 2007)
      Introduction: The amphipathic helical peptide mastoparan (MP; H-INLKALAALAKKIL-NH2) inserts into biological membranes to modulate the activity of heterotrimeric G proteins and other targets. Moreover, whilst cell free models of apoptosis demonstrate MP to facilitate mitochondrial permeability transition and release of apoptogenic cytochrome c, MP-induced death of intact cells has been attributed to its non-specific membrane destabilising properties (necrotic mechanisms). However, MP and related peptides are known to activate other signalling systems, including p42/p44 MAP kinases and could therefore, also modulate cell fate and specific apoptotic events. The ability of MP to facilitate mitochondrial permeability in cell free systems has lead to proposals that MP could be of utility in tumour therapeutics provided that it conferred features of cellular penetration and mitochondrial localization. We have recently reported that our highly potent amphipathic MP analogue mitoparan (mitP; [Lys5,8Aib10]MP; Aib = -aminoisobutyric acid) specifically promotes apoptosis of human cancer cells, as was confirmed by in situ TUNEL staining and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, we have also demonstrated that mitP penetrates plasma membranes and redistributes to co-localize with mitochondria. Complementary studies, using isolated mitochondria, further demonstrated that mitP, through co-operation with a protein of the permeability transition pore complex voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), induced swelling and permeabilization of mitochondria, leading to the release of the apoptogenic factor cytochrome c. An expanding field of peptide and cell penetrating peptide (CPP) research has focussed on the selective targeting of tumours by engineering constructs that incorporate cell-specific or tissue–specific address motifs. Peptidyl address motifs could enhance the selectivity of drug delivery whilst the improved cellular uptake offered by CPP enhances bioavailability. Thus and as a potential therapeutic strategy, we extended our findings to design target-specific mitP analogues. The integrin-specific address motif RGD and a Fas ligand mimetic WEWT were incorporated by N-terminal acylation of mitP to produce novel tandem-linked chimeric peptides.
    • MuTaTeD’ll A System for Music Information Retrieval of Encoded Music

      Boehm, Carola (Library and Information Commission, 2001)
      This is the final publication of the results of the project “MuTaTed’II”, A system for Information Retrieval of Encoded Music”. The aim of the project was to design and implement an information retrieval system with delivery/access services for digital music and sound. The project was documented and the results presented at various conferences; (ICMC 2000 Berlin, ISMI 2000 Massachusetts, Euromicro 2000 Amsterdam).
    • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, DNA Repair and Cancer

      Dibra, Harpreet K.; Perry, Chris J.; Nicholl, Iain D. (InTech, 2011)
    • A practical single refinement method for B

      Dunne, S. E.; Conroy, S.; University of Teesside. School of Computing. (Springer Berlin, 2008-08)
      The authors propose a single refinement method for B, inspired directly by Gardiner and Morgan’s longstanding single complete rule for data refinement, and rendered practical by application of the current first author’s recent first-order characterisation of refinement between monotonic computations
    • Remediation of oil spills using zeolites

      Fullen, Michael A.; Kelay, Asha; Williams, Craig D. (2011)
      Current research is testing the hypothesis that zeolites can efficiently and cost effectively adsorb oil spills. To date, this aspect of zeolites science has received little attention. A series of five Master of Science (M.Sc.) Projects at the University of Wolverhampton have shown that the zeolite clinoptilolite can effectively adsorb oil. Various sand-clinoptilolite mixes were tested in replicated laboratory analyses in terms of their ability to adsorb engine oil. Adsorption increased with clinoptilolite amount. The relationship between percentage clinoptilolite and oil adsorption was asymptotic. Thus, on a cost-effective basis, a 20% clinoptilolite: 80% sand mix seems the most costeffective mix. However, a particularly exciting finding was that it was possible to burn the oil-sand-zeolite mix and reuse the ignited mix for further oil adsorption. Experiments are ongoing, but to date the ignition and adsorption cycle has been repeated, on a replicated basis, seven times. Still, the ignited mix adsorbs significantly more oil than the sand control. Initial results suggest that the temperature of ignition is critical, as high temperatures can destroy the crystal and micro-pore structure of zeolites. Thus, low temperature ignition (~400oC) seems to allow the retention of structural integrity. Similar results were obtained using the zeolite chabazite and experiments are in progress on phillipsite, which is the third major zeolite mineral. If the hypotheses can be proven, there are potentially immense benefits. Sand-zeolite mixtures could be used to effectively adsorb terrestrial oil spills (i.e. at oil refinery plants, road accidents, beach spills from oil tankers and spills at petrol stations) and thus remediate oil-contaminated soils. The contaminated mix could be ignited and, given the appropriate infrastructure, the energy emission of combustion could be used as a source for electrical power. Then, the ignited mix could be reused in subsequent oil spills. This offers enormous potential for an environmentally-friendly sustainable ‘green’ technology. It would also represent intelligent use of zeolite resources. On a global scale, including Europe, clinoptilolite is the most common and inexpensive zeolite resource.