• Remediation of oil spills using zeolites

      Fullen, Michael A.; Kelay, Asha; Williams, Craig D. (2011)
      Current research is testing the hypothesis that zeolites can efficiently and cost effectively adsorb oil spills. To date, this aspect of zeolites science has received little attention. A series of five Master of Science (M.Sc.) Projects at the University of Wolverhampton have shown that the zeolite clinoptilolite can effectively adsorb oil. Various sand-clinoptilolite mixes were tested in replicated laboratory analyses in terms of their ability to adsorb engine oil. Adsorption increased with clinoptilolite amount. The relationship between percentage clinoptilolite and oil adsorption was asymptotic. Thus, on a cost-effective basis, a 20% clinoptilolite: 80% sand mix seems the most costeffective mix. However, a particularly exciting finding was that it was possible to burn the oil-sand-zeolite mix and reuse the ignited mix for further oil adsorption. Experiments are ongoing, but to date the ignition and adsorption cycle has been repeated, on a replicated basis, seven times. Still, the ignited mix adsorbs significantly more oil than the sand control. Initial results suggest that the temperature of ignition is critical, as high temperatures can destroy the crystal and micro-pore structure of zeolites. Thus, low temperature ignition (~400oC) seems to allow the retention of structural integrity. Similar results were obtained using the zeolite chabazite and experiments are in progress on phillipsite, which is the third major zeolite mineral. If the hypotheses can be proven, there are potentially immense benefits. Sand-zeolite mixtures could be used to effectively adsorb terrestrial oil spills (i.e. at oil refinery plants, road accidents, beach spills from oil tankers and spills at petrol stations) and thus remediate oil-contaminated soils. The contaminated mix could be ignited and, given the appropriate infrastructure, the energy emission of combustion could be used as a source for electrical power. Then, the ignited mix could be reused in subsequent oil spills. This offers enormous potential for an environmentally-friendly sustainable ‘green’ technology. It would also represent intelligent use of zeolite resources. On a global scale, including Europe, clinoptilolite is the most common and inexpensive zeolite resource.
    • Soil conservation using palm-mat geotextiles on loamy sand soils in the United Kingdom

      Bhattacharyya, Ranjan; Davies, Kathleen; Fullen, Michael A.; Booth, Colin A. (University of Wolverhampton in association with International Soil Conservation Organization, 2008)
      Geotextile-mats constructed from Borassus aethiopum (Borassus Palm) and Mauritia flexuosa (Buriti Palm) leaves have the potential to decrease soil erosion. In the U.K., field experiments are being conducted on the effectiveness of palm-mats to reduce soil erosion at Hilton, east Shropshire. Twelve plots (each plot measuring 1.0 x 1.0 m; 6 plots were completely covered with Borassus mats, and the other 6 plots were bare) were established to study the effects of geotextile-mats on splash erosion. Eight runoff plots (10 x 1 m on a 15o slope) were used, with duplicate treatments: (i) bare soil; (ii) grassed, (iii) bare soil with 1 m Borassus-mat buffer zones and (iv) completely covered with Borassus mats. Runoff volume and sediment yield were measured after each substantial storm from 25/03/02-10/05/04 (total precipitation = 1320 mm). Results indicate that palm-mats on bare soil significantly reduced total soil splash erosion by ~50% compared with bare soil (34.2 g m-2; during 10/06/02-09/02/04, total precipitation = 1038 mm). Total runoff from bare plots was 3.58 litres m-2 and total sediment yield was 8.58 g m-2. Borassus mats as buffer strips reduced runoff by ~36% and soil erosion by ~57%. Total soil loss from the completely covered plots was only ~16% less than the buffer zone plots. To confirm the results, another set of runoff experiments are in progress at Hilton, with one additional treatment (bare soil with 1 m Buriti-mat buffer zones) compared with the earlier experiment. Results (08/01/07-24/08/07; total precipitation = 702 mm) indicate that total runoff from bare plots was 21.2 litres m-2 and total sediment yield was 2302 g m-2. Borassus and Buriti mats as 1 m buffer strips reduced runoff by ~86 and 61%, respectively, and soil erosion by ~93 and 98%, respectively. Buffer strips of Borassus mats are as effective as complete cover of the same mats and are more effective in reducing runoff water than the buffer strips of Buriti mats. Combined results from both sets of runoff experiments (total precipitation = 2022 mm) suggest that application of Borassus mats as 1 m protective buffer strips on bare soil reduced runoff by ~77% and soil erosion by ~93%. Thus, Borassus-mat (buffer strips) cover on vulnerable segments of the soilscape is highly effective for soil and water conservation on temperate loamy sand soils.
    • Suitability of MANET Protocols for Heterogeneous Mobile Devices Communication in Gaming and Multimedia

      Salim, Aly; Mehdi, Qasim (University of Wolverhampton, School of Computing and Information Technology, 2013-07-01)
      he improvement and development of MANET protocols has been widely researched in order to bring about new technology with the rapidly developing field. More emphasis has been placed on development of protocols with some improvements focused on one issue in MANETs (ECMANSI, MANSI, ZRP, DVMRP) than working on all round MANET that would significantly tackle most if not all issues with MANET protocols so far (FLIP). However, there has also been more emphasis on development of non demanding applications that are not included multiplayer gaming and real-time multimedia content rich streaming applications. This paper looks at the use of mobile devices in gaming and multimedia rich applications. It proposes a protocol, which is in development that offers better efficiency, reliability, robustness and adaptability of wireless communication.
    • Utilization of Palm-mat Geotextiles to Conserve Agricultural Soils.

      Bhattacharyya, Ranjan; Davies, Kathleen; Fullen, Michael A.; Booth, Colin A. (International Erosion Control Association (IECA), 2009)
      Previously, most studies on the effectiveness of geotextiles on soil erosion rates and processes were conducted in laboratory experiments for <1 h. Hence, at Hilton (52o33' N, 2o19' W), East Shropshire, UK, we investigated the effectiveness of employing palm-mat geotextiles (Borassus and Buriti mats) to reduce rainsplash erosion, runoff and soil loss under field conditions. This study is a component of the European Union-funded BORASSUS Project. The effects of Borassus mats on rainsplash erosion were studied for ~2 years (2002-2004), and re-established in January 2007 on a 0o slope. There were 12 experimental plots (six plots completely-covered with mats and six bare plots; each measuring 1.0 x 1.0 m). Runoff-plot studies were also conducted on the loamy sand soil at Hilton for 2 years (2002-2004) with duplicate treatments: (i) bare soil; (ii) grassed, (iii) bare soil with 1 m Borassus-mat buffer zones at the lower end of the plots and (iv) completely-covered with Borassus-mats. Each plot was 10 x 1 m on a 15o (26.6%) slope. To confirm the results, another set of experiments have been in progress at Hilton since January 2007, with one additional treatment (bare soil with 1 m Buriti-mat buffer zones) compared with the earlier experiment. Runoff and soil erosion were collected from each plot in a concrete gutter, leading to a 0.02 m3 (20 liters) capacity receptacle placed inside a 0.14 m3 (140 liters) capacity container. Results (06/10/02-02/09/04; total precipitation = 1038.3 mm) showed Borassus mats on bare soil reduced total rainsplash erosion by ~50% compared with bare plots (9.64 kg m-2; 1.97 lb ft-2). The use of Borassus mats on bare soil (during 01/22/07-01/21/08; total precipitation = 919.2 mm) also reduced soil splash erosion by ~90%. During 03/25/02-05/10/04 (total precipitation = 1319.8 mm) complete cover of Borassus mats on bare soil reduced total runoff by ~19% and soil erosion by ~64%. Furthermore, Borassus mats as 1 m buffer strips on bare soil reduced runoff by ~36% and soil erosion by ~57%. During 01/08/07-01/14/08 (total precipitation = 923.4 mm), plots with Borassus and Buriti mats as buffer strips on bare soil reduced sediment yield by ~93 and 98%, respectively, and runoff by ~83 and 63%, respectively. Buffer strips of Borassus mats were also as effective as complete cover of the same mats. Thus, utilization of palm-mat geotextiles as buffer strips on bare plots (area coverage ~10%) is highly effective for soil and water conservation.
    • Verifying safety policies with size properties and alias controls

      Chin, Wei-Ngan; Khoo, Siau-Cheng; Qin, Shengchao; Popeea, Corneliu; Nguyen, Huu Hai (2013-07-01)
    • We have eyes as well as ears: experimental music and the visual arts

      Ryan, David; Anglia Ruskin University (Ashgate Academic Press, 2009-09)
      This chapter deals with the relationship, influence, and reciprocal nature, of the visual arts and experimental music. While it connects with contemporary practices, it also attempts to trace certain historical threads back to Cage, the abstract expressionist painters and the discourses evolving from these. It looks at dominant ideas emanating from modernist notions – firstly formalist and media specific ideas and then conceptual and environmental influences. It argues that visual art’s evolving open space of discourse has allowed a platform for experimental music that traditional musical contexts have denied.