• Exploring ePortfolios and weblogs as learning narratives in a community of new teachers.

      Hughes, Julie (International Society for Teacher Education, 200)
      Drawing upon student narratives, the author explores the extent to which a Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) teaching community at the University of Wolverhampton in the United Kingdom (UK), developed an approach to the process and product of e-portfolio which optimised the concrete outcomes required by external professional bodies, while harnessing the technology's potential for promoting collaboration and discursive reflection.
    • Letting in the Trojan mouse: Using an eportfolio system to re-think pedagogy.

      Hughes, Julie (The Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ascilite), 2008-02-15)
      E-learning research, as an emergent field in the UK, is highly political in nature (Conole & Oliver, 2007, p.6) occupying a complex landscape which houses policy-makers, researchers and practitioners. Increasingly and more interestingly, the landscape is being shaped by the narratives and experiences of the learners themselves (Creanor et al., 2006, Conole et al., 2006) and the use of Web 2.0 technologies. However, as Laurillard (2007, p.xv) reminds us we still, ‘tend to use technology to support traditional modes of teaching’ and ‘we scarcely have the infrastructure, the training, the habits or the access to the new technology, to be optimising its use just yet’ (p.48). Web 2.0 spaces, literacies and practices offer the possibility for new models of education (Mayes & de Freitas, 2007, p.13) which support iterative and integrative learning but as educators and higher educational establishments are we prepared and ready to re-think our pedagogies and re-do (Beetham & Sharpe 2007, p.3) our practices? This concise paper will reflect upon how the use of new learning landscapes such as eportfolios might offer us the opportunity to reflect upon the implications of letting in the e-learning eportfolio Trojan mouse (Sharpe & Oliver, 2007, p.49).