• Climate Change Liability: Transnational law and practice

      Lord, Richard; Goldberg, Silke; Rajamani, Lavanya; Brunnee, Jutta (Cambridge University Press, 03/12/2011)
      As frustration mounts in some quarters at the perceived inadequacy or speed of international action on climate change and as the likelihood of significant impacts grows, the focus is increasingly turning to liability for climate change damage. Actual or potential climate change liability implicates a growing range of actors, including governments, industry, businesses, non-governmental organisations, individuals and legal practitioners. Climate Change Liability provides an objective, rigorous and accessible overview of the existing law and the direction it might take in seventeen developed and developing countries and the European Union. In some jurisdictions, the applicable law is less developed and less the subject of current debate. In others, actions for various kinds of climate change liability have already been brought, including high profile cases such as Massachusetts vs. Environmental Protection Agency in the United States. Each chapter explores the potential for and barriers to climate change liability in private and public law. For more information or to purchase a copy of this book online, go to www.cambridge.org/climateliability/. Cambridge University Press also has a microsite on climate change featuring a number of their titles: http://www.cambridge.org/features/climatechange/
    • Managing Water Locally: An essential dimension of community water development

      Bunclark, Lisa; Carter, Richard; Casey, Vincent; Day, St John; Guthrie, Daphne (Oxfam GB, 08/11/2011)
      Communities are frequently excluded from important aspects of environmental management. But they can play a fundamental role in the management of common pool resources such as water. This is particularly true when state capacity is weak or when communities remain on the periphery of support from any government. Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) has been widely promoted over the last two decades as a solution for nations’ resources. Yet, managing water resources at a global or state level can be over-ambitious and unrealistic, particularly when many developing countries have weak regulating institutions and limited technical and financial capacity. There is a need to redefine the mechanism for water resource management – giving greater respect to the needs, priorities and possibilities of different countries and contexts. There is potential to develop creative and realistic options for water resource management, particularly at local geographical scales, involving water users. This report explores how local water resources can be managed successfully by community-based institutions in support of state-level initiatives, where they exist. It follows 12 months of close collaboration between the Institute of Civil Engineers, Oxfam GB and WaterAid, who are jointly promoting Community-Based Water Resource Management. ‘...the potential for monitoring and managing water resources at local or community level should be better acknowledged. In particular, traditional water management practices must be recognised and used as a foundation for the development of future water management strategies.’ Sir Crispin Tickell.