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dc.contributor.authorChachko, Elena
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T12:46:43Z
dc.date.available2020-02-07T12:46:43Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2384/582963
dc.description.abstractThere are many myths about the role of courts in foreign affairs and national security in Western democracies. Traditionally, courts and scholars in different jurisdictions have taken the view that executive action related to foreign affairs has unique attributes, making it ill-suited for review by unelected judges with limited institutional competence.1 This approach has relied on a combination of functional considerations and concerns about the democratic legitimacy of judicial interference with inherently political foreign and security policies.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleForeign Affairs in Court: Lessons from CJEU Targeted Sanctions Jurisprudenceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.volume44en_US
dc.source.issue1en_US
dc.source.beginpage2en_US
dc.source.endpage51en_US
dc.source.numberofpages50en_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-07T12:46:44Z
dc.source.journaltitleYale Journal of International Lawen_US


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