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dc.contributor.authorPessach, Guy
dc.contributor.authorShur-Ofry, Michal
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T13:29:22Z
dc.date.available2020-02-07T13:29:22Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2384/582969
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the interface between copyright law and the Holocaust. The Holocaust's duration and scope, its occurrence in the midst of the twentieth century with photography and film technologies already available, and its setting at the heart of Europe, yielded countless documents, diaries, notes, memoirs, musical works, photographs, films, letters, and additional artifacts. On the victims' part, many of those items-including secret archives comprised at various ghettos, music composed in concentration camps, and personal diaries-manifest an explicit act of real-time historical documentation for future generations. On the perpetrators' side, some materials were produced as a result of organized documentation and others-such as Joseph Goebbels' diaries or Hitler's Mein Kampf--comprise records of prominent figures in the Nazi regime. Numerous Holocaust-related materials are still subject to copyright protection. Yet, the impact of copyright law on the memory of the Holocaust remains largely unexplored.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCopyright and the Holocausten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.volume30en_US
dc.source.issue2en_US
dc.source.beginpage121en_US
dc.source.endpage172en_US
dc.source.numberofpages52en_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-07T13:29:23Z
dc.source.journaltitleYale Journal of Law & the Humanitiesen_US


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