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dc.contributor.authorAblavsky, Gregory
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T13:51:28Z
dc.date.available2020-02-07T13:51:28Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2384/582976
dc.description.abstractThis Article offers an alternate account of federalism’s late eighteenth-century origins. In place of scholarly and doctrinal accounts that portray federalism as a repudiation of models of unitary sovereignty, it emphasizes the federalist ideology of dual sovereignty as a form of centralization—a shift from a world of diffuse sovereignty to one where authority was increasingly imagined as concentrated in the hands of only two legitimate sovereigns. In making this claim, the Article focuses on two sequential late eighteenth-century transformations. The first concerned sovereignty. Pre-Revolutionary ideas about sovereignty reflected early modern corporatist understandings of authority as well as imperial realities of uneven jurisdiction. But the Revolution elevated a new understanding of sovereignty in which power derived from the consent of a uniform people. This conception empowered state legislatures, which, throughout the 1780s, sought to use their status under new state constitutions as the sole repositories of popular authority to subordinate competing claims to authority made by corporations, local institutions, Native nations, and separatist movements.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEmpire States: The Coming of Dual Federalismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.volume128en_US
dc.source.issue7en_US
dc.source.beginpage1792en_US
dc.source.endpage1868en_US
dc.source.numberofpages77en_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-07T13:51:28Z
dc.source.journaltitleThe Yale Law Journalen_US


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